Abruzzo

Abruzzo

Abruzzo’s Gran Sasso d’Italia is an imposing, perennially snow-capped mountain that is an enduring symbol of the region and also responsible for the highest of the Apennine summits, Corno Grande. Indeed, much of Abruzzo is given to mountainous wilderness and a significant amount of it is allocated to national parkland, preserving a vast array of beasts and a somewhat wild and solitary reputation. And although the Apennine influenced environment is typically Abruzzese, so too is the maritime climate of the eastern border on the Adriatic Sea.

For many years, the majority of the wine from Abruzzo has been composed of two varieties from two blanket DOCs, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo (1968) and Trebbiano d’Abruzzo (1972), with no distinction available to differentiate between the warmer areas and the cooler, elevated, and arguably superior, territories. Today, Montepulciano and Trebbiano still dominate, ...READ MORE

Abruzzo

Abruzzo’s Gran Sasso d’Italia is an imposing, perennially snow-capped mountain that is an enduring symbol of the region and also responsible for the highest of the Apennine summits, Corno Grande. Indeed, much of Abruzzo is given to mountainous wilderness and a significant amount of it is allocated to national parkland, preserving a vast array of beasts and a somewhat wild and solitary reputation. And although the Apennine influenced environment is typically Abruzzese, so too is the maritime climate of the eastern border on the Adriatic Sea.

For many years, the majority of the wine from Abruzzo has been composed of two varieties from two blanket DOCs, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo (1968) and Trebbiano d’Abruzzo (1972), with no distinction available to differentiate between the warmer areas and the cooler, elevated, and arguably superior, territories. Today, Montepulciano and Trebbiano still dominate, but there is some nuance available in the labelling to differentiate zones. Abruzzo has had considerable success exporting their DOC wines and although they may lack the glamour of their cousins to the north, the wines certainly have broad international recognition and, given their prodigious output, the ability to comfortably supply the market. Abruzzo is a long way from challenging the heavyweights like the Veneto or Puglia for volume, but it comfortably pips more fabled regions such as Piedmont and Tuscany, sitting fifth out of the twenty regions. 

The quality ambitions of Abruzzese growers have historically tended to fall on the modest side, sometimes giving the impression that this was a function of capacity (grape and territory) rather than a lack of ambition, however the wines of the legendary producer, Valentini, often suggested otherwise. Today, with a focus on careful viticulture and the demarcation of better production zones, there is a strong core of producers that are proving Abruzzo is wine country of remarkable possibility, and that Montepulciano just may deserve a place alongside Italy’s greatest autochthonous varieties.

Principal denominations: Abruzzo DOC, Cerasuolo d'Abruzzo DOC, Montepulciano d'Abruzzo Colline Teramane DOCG, 

Montepulciano d'Abruzzo DOC, Trebbiano d'Abruzzo DOC
Important white varieties: Trebbiano, Pecorino
Important red varieties: Montepulciano, Sangiovese

 

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